My Photo
Follow UselessTree on Twitter

Zhongwen

Nedstat



  • eXTReMe Tracker
Blog powered by Typepad
Member since 07/2005

« What's Next for Chen Guangcheng? | Main | Chen Guangcheng: It ain't over 'til it's over »

May 03, 2012

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451cdc869e2016766106823970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Core Issue in the Chen Guangcheng case:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

"The bottom line here is what it has long been. If the PRC leadership - Wen Jiabao, Hu Jintao and company - want to treat Chen humanely, they can treat Chen humanely."

It seems that there are two associated thoughts to this point. The first is what came out quite early in this whole episode, that of the continuing rift between central/national goals and priorities and local goals and priorities. As with certain issues of legal reform, the text is often less implemented on the ground, and the central leadership has a different set of incentives to work with compared to local officials. When one can be shown to contradict the other, the more powerful set of actors, the central government, will win out. But, this implies the circus surrounding Chen's situation hasn't created a new set of incentives for the central government that did not exist before.

The second issue, which has been mentioned briefly by a few people throughout the day is that of continuing rifts within the central leadership. A kind of who is with Wen and who is against him rumor mill appears to be gathering steam. If this is the case, or even a minor part, how do you see the situation changing? What happens when it isn't as simple as assuming a unified PRC leadership-and who wants to treat/act whom humanely-on an issue that used to be confined to parochial importance, rise to a national and international spotlight, and hinge on separate incentives for various high level factions within the party?

Come, come. "The PRC has failed to provide a consistent and fair rule of law"? Chen has fared much better than Bradyley Manning and countless others who have annoyed our own government.
Also, we have heard only a very Westernized version of Chen's case. For some of its other dimensions, look here: http://blog.hiddenharmonies.org/2012/04/chen-guangcheng-escapes-waging-pr-campaign-with-western-press/

And that link does not mention the involvement of the illegal and dangerous underground support for Chen from US Christian groups. Alwasy a no-no in a country that has lost millions of its citizens to Christian mayhem.

There is a side to this Chen sage that I find even more appalling than the treatment by the Chinese authorities.

And that is the supposed journalists, mostly British, who used the man to try to tarnish the image of the US among the Chinese and around the world. I knew it would come to this when China Aid put out a statement saying that Chinese dissidents "revere the US" for reasons like this. It was then open season.

Chen has been so skillfully manipulated by the pseudo-tabloid British media to say exactly what they wanted him to say that he might as well have been speaking with a British accent. I know this will never happen - journalists are loathe to questions each other - but the story of how and why he changed his mind so frequently and if journalists influenced him in any way needs to be told. This kind of thing happens all the time but it's rare for it to happen in such a short span of time and with such devastating consequences that it bears investigating.

Too bad we can't have this debate in public in China.

godfree: "And that link does not mention the involvement of the illegal and dangerous underground support for Chen from US Christian groups. Alwasy a no-no in a country that has lost millions of its citizens to Christian mayhem."

This country you speak of is China? The reality, of course, is that China lost millions of its citizens to anti-Christian, atheist mayhem, under the direction of Chairman Mao. Mao almost succeeded in wiping out the Christian church in China, but like other enemies of God before him, he failed: it is estimated that there are now 80 million Christians in China, perhaps more.

How is support for Chen from US Christian groups "illegal", by the way? Illegal in the US? Surely not? Illegal in China? How can the actions of groups in the US be illegal in China?

China Aid put out a statement saying that Chinese dissidents "revere the US" for reasons like this. It was then open season.

the most reliable source is Jerry Cohen, a man who has worked in and with China for decades on questions of law and the legal system.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Aidan's Way

  • :


    Understanding disability from a Taoist point of view

Globalpost