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« You Can't Legislate Filiality | Main | The Mundanity of Chinese Modernization: Air Pollution, Press Freedom, Political Reform »

January 09, 2013

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The question of Southern weekly is not as simple as it was described by western media. You should note the protests were not only by striking staffs but also Maoists angered and against the so called freedom of expression. Ai Weiwei may have plenty of support in the West, but plenty of critics at home, and I don't mean in the government only. The New Year greeting and dream of rule of law of Chinese constitution may not be too much to ask, and Xi probably would agree to certain extent, as the fight against corruption needs transparency and equal application of law. Yet the timing is very bad in a way. Xi was elected as party secretary in November, he will not become president until March. The period between is mean to let him have time to learn and master the levers of power. The challenge and the response trying to force Xi's hand while constitutionally he's still without the complete state power is awkward to say the least. The propaganda official probably will be reassigned after a certain period of face saving. But one thing I think should be make clear, it's wishful thinking the West indulge on the Chinese Communist Party will relinquish power to the liberals. As for the Confucian scholars they have been serving the emperors for 2,000 years, always finding quotes from Analects or other texts to justify their subservience, I would not count too much on them.

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