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« Charismatic Virtue | Main | Confucianism's Problem with Modernity - a brief comment »

February 09, 2012

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I disagree.

Ritualism has always been a key aspect of Confucianism. Look at the Han Confucians. How many equivalents of modern focus groups must have been created for the purpose of "correct ritual"?

And they were successful. As Napoleon Hill said, all achievements in physical reality must first begin in the mind. Ritualism, e.g. as described in the article, creates a Confucian virtual reality for these youngsters. Once this reality is created, sustained effort will eventually spill over to society at large.

I do not agree with the Chinese Hanfu movement for political reasons (e.g. their conflicts with minority nationalities and disdain for the Qing Dynasty). I also disagree with the particular way some Chinese Confucians are seeking to revive Confucianism - e.g. looking only at classical texts without an understanding of folk and regional culture. However, reviving a culture always necessitates reviving the symbols of the culture, because these symbols are the intermediaries which allow the message to be transmitted in the first place.

Upon reading the article, I believe what Mr. Park is trying to do is what we in China call 中行路线, e.g. create Confucian realities within the modern state and then expand these realities slowly but surely.

His statement at the end of the article was a bit disappointing, though. What he should have said was, "Brick by brick we will rebuild our Confucian society, even if it takes three hundred years. One day all under Heaven will walk the way of Confucius."

I thought Korean Confucians were even more hardcore than Chinese Confucians. A bit disappointed...

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